Going Deeper – Kaiiki by Hitoshi Uemoto

I have to confess I had never heard that along with the well-known kamikaze suicide air pilots, the Japanese military had also employed suicide divers, human land mines, suicide boats, and manned torpedoes as they desperately tried to reverse their worsening fortunes in the last months of World War II. It is the manned torpedo program that forms the... 

Discovering the Sensei Through the Pupil

Photo by Taiji Arita. Courtesy of Gallery 916. Whenever I stumble upon, through old books or more often than not these days online, photographers of the past that were previously unknown to me, I feel a heightened sense of excitement. Excitement is of course common to the discovery of new up-and-coming photographers, but there’s an added thrill... 

The Spacious Warmth of Gallery 916

Gallery 916 — even the entrance feels spacious. The other day I was surfing online and I came across a new to me photography gallery just by chance. I was intrigued because one, it had earlier this year staged a Ralph Gibson exhibition, and two, I noticed that Yoshihiko Ueda, who is a well-established photographer both commercially and artistically,... 

Draped in Uncertainty – The Other Side by Masako Miyazaki

“What is On the other side In the forest draped in uncertainty I am alone, gazing in admiration” – Masako Miyazaki When presenting and discussing Japanese Photography I often wonder whether myself and everyone else share our definition of what Japanese Photography is (or is not). Whether there is even a need to ask for a definition or... 

Yoshiichi Hara’s Mandala Zukan

We’re going to start a new series of posts here on some of the photo books in our collection, the theme of which would be something like photographers you’ve probably never heard of before but should, or alternatively photo books you’ve probably never seen before but should. Sometimes those two themes might overlap. Without further... 

Dizzy Noon: An Exchange of Culture and Awkwardness as Guests Entertain Hosts

Review by John Sypal for Japan Exposures Reflecting on an special event held on a Sunday in the mid 1960s photographer Takao Niikura writes in the afterword of his book Dizzy Noon that: “This was a chance to enter into the “other world” just for a day, a world surrounded by a two-meter, twenty centimeter tall barbed wire fence. I... 

Life Within Death – Nirai by Manabu Someya

“You shall go on a beautiful boat.” – Farewell to the dead on Yoron Island (Amami Islands, Japan) Put simply, a photograph reproduces what has been in front of the camera at the time of exposure, a moment in time, a selected fraction of reality. More philosophically, it also records what went on behind the camera in the photographer’s... 

The Built-Up Country, in Detail — Zaisyo

Zaisyo, by Mitsuru Fujita -- Published by Tosei-sha, May 2010 Review by Peter Evans for Japan Exposures. Z aisyo means something like the country or one’s country. The photographer is Mitsuru Fujita, and this is his second photobook. The book tells us that he was born in 1934, became a freelance photographer in 1961, set up a company called Fujitaman... 

The Paths of Photography: Asphalt

When you hear the term photo magazine, it is difficult to not immediately jump onto the association of a colorful, glossy and above all, camera- and ad-guzzling publication we are all too familiar with. However, when Atsushi Fujiwara, photographer, photo studio manager and publisher of Asphalt contacted us to present the photo magazine he is publishing,... 

Tokyo Stories in Stockholm

Rickshaw Driver, Ginza,Tokyo, 1938. Photograph by Hiroshi Hamaya Review by Lars Epstein for Japan Exposures. The photographer Hiroshi Hamaya (1915-1999) was only 16 years old when in 1931, with his then-new Leica camera, he took the oldest of the pictures displayed in the photographic exhibition “Tokyo Stories”, which opened at the Kulturhuset... 

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